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Songs from LSOH that were not used in the movie

edited November 2014 in Theater
The only version of "Little Shop of Horrors" that I have seen thus far is the 1986 movie. The ONE thing that I didn't like about it was the fact that many of the songs that were written for the stage show (those songs being "Mushnik & Son", "Closed For Renovation", and "Now (It's Just The Gas)") were not used in the film. Also, I would like to point out that the song "Some Fun Now" was a re-write of "Ya Never Know". For fairly obvious reasons, the fact that those songs were omitted really gets my goat!

Comments

  • @Jordan Yeah I hear ya, Hollywood can be pretty... weird like that. I'm pretty sure Howard thought the same (especially since they changed his ending). And I recently saw a video of the stage version of Little Shop from 1982 except it only had audio, and showed a bunch of pictures from the production. But it was still worth watching as u listened to every genius word Howard wrote from the original actors and heard the production how it was meant to be.
  • I forgot to mention that the Little Shop video was on YouTube.
  • Changes are going to be made in any adaptation. Book, musical, comic book, whatever.
    Sure those songs are great but they for some reason (time, atmosphere) didn't fit the vision of the filmmakers for the movie version which is made for a different audience.

    My personal theory? "Mushnik & Son" and "Closed for Renovation" ultimately makes Musknik a bigger character than they went for in the movie and "Now (It's Just the Gas)" would have taken away from the whole big-eyed-Seymour-is-a-super-innocent-guy thing they decided to go with for it because it ultimately shows that Seymour made a completely conscious choice to let Orin die. (As for the movie, I've seen it argued that it was an accident/that he changed his mind, etc.)

    I understand it. I don't like it, but I get it.
  • edited January 2015
    I just think they're unnecessary for the film. Since the theater is more abstract and open to interpretation, "Closed for Renovation" is more or less a transition song. Since the set doesn't change all that much, it needs to be explained "The shop is doing great, renovations are happening, let us show you." In the film, you can do that with a quick montage or a just a cut, since the audience will see the store packed and the shop looking nicer. The same thing with "Call Back in the Morning;" it's a song showing that the shop is thriving and doing well. In the film, you can pack the shop with extras and just show it without having to explain it.

    I feel like the adoption storyline, and "Mushnik & Son," was cut to streamline the story a bit. Really, it doesn't really do all that much for the overall plot; Mushnik adopts Seymour partway through the show, and it's not talked about again. It was probably cut because it was felt that it would slow the overall story down. "Now (It's Just the Gas)" I feel could've worked, but half the song is Seymour talking to the audience. That's incredibly hard to do, and it might've been felt that it would be better to just show it. (I don't think it was a choice to make him more sympathetic, since in the workprint edit of the film, it's a bit more obvious that Seymour is waiting for him to die and ignoring Orin's pained "Help me!," which got cut, I assume, to make the happy ending work better.)

    The only real butchering job I feel that was done was "The Meek Shall Inherit." I understand streamlining the three contract verses into one, but that caused Seymour's Soliloquy to go on far too long. They should've decided to have Howard and Alan write a new song, that had all the same information, that fit better in it's place, or maybe just had Howard edit it down to a more manageable length.
  • ^ Good points all around.

    "I don't think it was a choice to make him more sympathetic, since in the workprint edit of the film, it's a bit more obvious that Seymour is waiting for him to die and ignoring Orin's pained "Help me!," which got cut, I assume, to make the happy ending work better." (@JustinKudwa)

    "Making the happy ending work better" and "Sympathetic Seymour" is statements that go hand in hand in my view and that was basically what I meant as well. Basically what I was trying to say was that if Seymour was less so, the happy ending wouldn't work at all. I actually showed my friends who had never seen the movie before the Director's Cut version and they said they liked everything *except* the ending, very much for the same reasons the test group said before they added the happy ending.
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